Plants growing

We grow a range of Australian native plants suited for Yass and the Southern tableland region, with a focus on understory and shrub species.

These are often chosen for their ability to tolerate drought, heavy clay soils, and frost. We also select for a range of flowering months, particularly through winter.

We grow from seed, and cuttings, depending on the species, as well as from specially-ordered tubestock. Our plants are generally available in spring and autumn each year.

We’re only open by appointment, or you can hopefully catch us at local markets.

We generally stock the plants below in 140mm pots for $11.00 each (including GST):

Medium shrub
H: 2-4m
W: 2m
F: Yellow

Acacia deanei – Dean’s Wattle

Grows mainly 2-4 m tall and grow on plains, slopes and tablelands, often near watercourses, in gullies or on stony hillsides, and on a wide range of soil types. Flowers throughout the year, especially during March to August

Small tree
H: <10m
W:
F: Yellow

Acacia pendula – Weeping Myall

Grows to 10m and has a graceful, weeping habit, and striking blue-grey foliage. Will grow in clay soils and is frost tolerant. It provides good shelter or windbreak, and helps attract native birds to the garden.

Groundcover
H: 0.3m
W: 3m
F: Dusty Red

Banksia blechnifolia – Fern-like Banksia

A prostrate groundcover with interesting serrated foliage and large attractive dusky-red flower heads.

Use it as an eye-catching feature shrub or as a pot plant for a large container. It is a very low maintenance shrub. Usually pollinated by ants. Grows best in light to medium, well-drained soils in full sun or partial shade. Regular watering encourages growth. Tolerates drought and frost once established.

Medium shrub
H: 3m
W: 2m
F: Yellow

Banksia Marginata – Silver Banksia, Honeysuckle (sold out)

Typically it is a medium sized shrub about 3 metres high by a similar spread. Leaves are up to 60mm long and 3 to 13mm wide. Upper surface is dark green with the lower surface white and hairy, appearing silvery in the wind. Small serrations may be found on the leaf edges and tips. The pale yellow flowers are arranged in pairs and densely packed in cylindrical spikes which are up to 100mm long. It is a hardy, fairly fast growing and long lived species that can be grown in a wide variety of environmental conditions. It favours a sunny or partly shady position, and may become spindly if grown in the shade. It can tolerate a variety of soil types including sandy soils, loams and clay. It prefers well-drained soils, but can tolerate moist and even waterlogged sites. It is drought resistant and will do well in exposed windy locations.

Small shrub
H: <3m
W: 2m
F: red/orange

Banksia spinulosa – Hairpin Banksia (sold out)

Banksia spinulosa, sometimes known as Hairpin Banksia, is native to the three eastern States of Australia, extending along the coast from Victoria to Cairns and distributed from the coastline into forest areas of the Great Dividing Range.

It varies greatly in height (1 -3 m) and flower colour, with variations of brown, red, orange and gold. The flower spikes range from 10-20 cm in length. The individual flowers open from the top of the spike and provide a long flowering period from autumn through the winter to spring when the three stages of cone development can be observed – bud, flower spike and seed capsule. Leaves are long and narrow, 3-8 cm long by 2-7 mm wide, and variably toothed.

Pruning is mostly unnecessary if the plant is not in a confined position. It should form a rounded shrub about 2 m diameter in open sun.

B. spinulosa grows well in soils ranging from light through to moderately heavy with good moisture and drainage. Soils with high lime content lead to yellowing foliage and poor growth. Canberra winter frosts do not impede its growth and forms from southern sources can be regarded as frost hardy.

Medium shrub
H: 3m
W: 2m
F: Red

Callistemonn citrinus – Crimson Bottlebrush – 3m, red, spring & autumn

This hardy shrub is probably the best known bottlebrush and is widely cultivated. The bright red flower-spikes appear in summer and autumn. Crimson Bottlebrush grows well in wet conditions and usually reaches 4 m. Plants should be lightly pruned and fertilised after flowering. Neglected or mis-shapen plants respond to hard pruning.

Medium shrub
H: 3m
W: 2m
F: Yellow

Callistemon pallidus – Lemon Bottlebrush – 3m, yellow Sep-Jan

A tough, frost tolerant species which grows well in most soil conditions. Plants grow and flower best in full sun. The lemon-coloured flower spikes are produced in summer. Plants grow to about 3 m.

Groundcover
H: 0.15m
W: 0.5m
F: Yellow

Chrysocephalum apiculatum – Yellow Buttons

The stems and leaves of this form of C. apiculatum are covered in silky hairs which give the plant an overall grey-green appearance. The stems conform to ground contours and drape over low walls and kerbs. The flowers, which appear in late spring to early summer in Canberra, occur on the tips of the stems and rise up to 15 cm above the ground in compact heads up to 2.5 cm wide. They are a golden-yellow in colour.

When planted at 70 cm centres, plants grow quickly to cover the ground and form a compact mat, however, this is seldom enough to smother the more vigorous weeds.

Strappy
H: 1m
W: 1.5m
F: Blue/Purple

Dianella revoluta – Blue Flax-lily – 1m, blue/purple, Sep-Feb (sold out)

Grows as a dominant understorey species, it can form large spreading colonies. It grows to about 1m in height and has a diameter of up to 1.5m. The leaves are leathery, long and linear, with bright blue-purple flowers from spring to summer.

Groundcover
H: 0.3m
W: 2m
F: Yellow

Eutaxia microphylla – small-leaved mallee-pea

Grow to between 30 and 40 centimetres high. The small, grey green, narrow to ovate leaves are 2.3 to 4 mm long and 0.6 to 0.9 mm wide. The single pea flowers have dark red keels, yellow-orange wings and a yellow-orange standard with red markings on the rear. These are produced between July and October in the species native range

Small shrub
H: 1m
W: 4m
F: Orange/Pink

Grevillea diminuta – small grevillea (sold out)

This beautiful, spreading shrub grows to 1m in height, and up to 4m in diameter. The young stems are covered in fine rusty-red hairs. The thick leaves are 1-2cm long, elliptical to ovate, with the upper surfaces covered in flattened white hairs when young and becoming hairless with age, revealing a glossy, rich green colour. The lower surfaces of the leaves are covered with flattened silky hairs that persist with age, exposing a silvery, white colour. The striking flowers hang in pendulous clusters from the cascading branches, the outer being a rusty-red, and inner a bright pink-red.

Groundcover
H: 0.3m
W: 3m
F: Red

Grevillea gaudichaudii

A great groundcovering grevillea, it has bronze coloured new growth on the ferny and naturally dense foliage.

One plant can spread to 3 metres wide, making it a useful and weed deterring plant for landscaping work. Fast growing. It flowers in spring and summer with toothbrush style blooms that attract small nectar eating birds and insects. It is drought and frost resistant.

H: 2m
W: 2m
F: White

Leptospermum scoparium – Manuka – 2m, white-pink Sep-Dec

A usually compact shrub to 2 m high (often less) by 2 m wide. Leaves are variable in shape and size. They may be elliptical, broadly lanceolate or obovate and from 7 to 20 mm long. White flowers, occasionally tinged with pink and rarely red, 1 cm in diameter, occur in spring and early summer.

Medium shrub
H: 2.5m
W: 2m
F: Mauve

Prostanthea ovalifolia – Oval Leaved Mint Bush

Prostanthera ovalifolia is the most widely cultivated member of the genus. It is typically a medium shrub to about 2.5 metres high. Despite the specific name, the leaves may be lance-shaped to almost circular as well as oval shaped. In some forms the leaves may be slightly toothed along the margins; they are up to about 15mm long and are highly aromatic. The flowers are usually purple or mauve but pink and white coloured forms are also known. Flowering is usually prolific with the flowers almost obscuring the foliage. A form with variegated foliage is in cultivation.

P.ovalifolia is quick growing and should be pruned back annually by about one third if a bushy shape is to be retained. Like most prostantheras it prefers a well drained, moist position with some shelter from direct summer sun. Under dry conditions it will wilt noticeably but quickly recovers when watered. It is a good “indicator” of when watering is required in a garden generally.

Small shrub
H: 1.5m
W: 1.5m
F: Purple

Prostanthera incisa – cut leaf mintbush

A small dense shrub with highly aromatic foliage continuously releasing a mint essence into the atmosphere. A lavish display of violet flowers all but hides the soft leaves throughout spring and early summer, attracting butterflies and small insect-eating birds. Lends itself to hedging so plant close to paths and windows where you can enjoy the fragrance. Good pot plant also.

Groundcover
H: 0.5m
W: 1m
F: Pink/Mauve

Prostanthea scutellariodies – (sold out)

A typically a small, wiry shrub rarely exceeding half a metre in height. Leaves are linear up to 15mm long and are highly aromatic. The flowers are usually purple or mauve but pale pink forms are also known. Flowering occurs mainly in spring but there may also be flushes at other times of the year.

This species was once common in western Sydney but much of its habitat has been lost to the suburban sprawl. Like most prostantheras it prefers a well-drained position with some shelter from direct summer sun. It is a beautiful, small shrub – well worth persisting with.

Groundcover
H: 0.5m
W: 0.5m
F: Yellow

Pycnosoeus globosus – Drumsticks

Drumsticks, a member of the Asteraceae (Daisy) family, is a dense ground cover with a spread of at least 50 centimetres. Soft leaves are grey, long and narrow.

Golden globular flower heads are carried above the foliage on long stems. A large number of flowers appear in spring and summer. Mature plants may carry dozens of flower heads. The foliage provides a background to the flowers. Remove spent flowers to encourage more blooms.

A Drumsticks in full flower is a sight to behold in the garden. Flowers may be used in dry flower arrangements. Drumsticks would be at home in cottage gardens, rockeries or as a foreground plant in native gardens.

Small shrub
H: 1m
W: 1.2m
F: White

Westringia fruticosa smokey

A small shrub with soft grey-green and white variegated foliage with small white flowers, which are attractive to butterflies and harmless native bees. Attractive as a specimen or flowering container plant; ideal for formal hedging and for mid level screening.  Grows in a wide range of soils, and is well suited to coastal positions, as it is very salt tolerant.

Small shrub
H: 1.5m
W: 3m
F:

Westringia fruticosa white – native rosemary white
Westringia fruticosa blue – native rosemary blueFlowers dot the shapely plants, often forming a regular dome with its lower branches covering the ground. lt is useful as a large type of ground-cover plant. During the coldest weather it keeps a fresh appearance and is also drought hardy. Foliage is a dark, even green,  and leaf undersides gives a silvery tint which adds to its attractiveness. The name ‘Rosemary’ refers to the appearance of the plant only.The flowers are 2 centimetres across set around the stems in the axils of the leaves. In shape they resemble other flowers of the mint family. They are from white to palest mauve with reddish and yellow brown spots near the throat and are seen most months of the year except in extreme heat or cold. In November they are abundant.